Comments about this page

Excellent images and diagrams, heard a lot about these kind of digs on SEAX archeology, but never any info

By Liam Heatherson
On 08/05/2013

Thank you, Janet, for sharing this important information. We at AGES Archaeological and Historical Association have had a good few looks around at the Point. There is/was so much material, especially Roman. Castle Point needs its own proper Museum for all the finds, many of which have been shipped to Southend Museum where they are put in storage and forgotten.

By Robert Hallmann
On 16/05/2013

I have more to come Robert.

By Janet Penn
On 16/05/2013

I can remember having trips up the Red Hills with my dad Fred and sister Soraya digging up roman pottery.On one occasion that stands out he unearthed a black pot that was at least 15inches tall which contained bones. Nearby there were various bits of Samarin ware, which is red pottery.We went home and glued the red pottery together, it was a bowl with animals around the lip, we were a couple of pieces short so went back the next day and amazingly there they were on top of the mud. When we returned home we fitted the bits we had found in place and had another completed bowl. I have memories of the Evening Echo coming to our house and taking photographs, carrying the headlines "Fred's finds make history" also an archaeological team made a video, the pots were loaned to Southend museum for years then later went to Priory Park Museum in Southend their whereabouts are not known now. Just thought I would mention this because my dad passed away 16 years ago and feel he should be acknowledged in Canvey history.

By Paul Grimwood
On 14/06/2013

If you have a story to tell about your dad we would love to hear it. Especially if you have pictures.

By Janet Penn
On 14/06/2013

CANVEY’S SHAME – IT’S LOST HERITAGE Canvey Island has its 17th century dwellings, its museum for the recent past, it even has a dedicated degaussing station remembering the last war, all put together and collected by enthusiasts, but it’s real wealth of history, its distant past, has been totally overlooked. Not by everyone, as these pages prove. Individuals and groups have delved into that distant past that is preserved in the alluvial clay, in the Red Hills and now in the estuary. A plethora of sherds and even complete vessels from that distant past, Canvey’s real heritage, have been collected devotedly, often under trying circumstances, but there are no central register, no collective records, no interest officially. Two thousand years of history are simply forgotten, ignored, undervalued. Excellent collections have been given to Southend Museum, where they linger in its warehouse unloved and forgotten. Others are in private collections, admirably dug up, cleaned and preserved. One set of funerary urns is about to be shipped to the States, because there is no appetite here for their importance. And these are vessels that once held the ashes of Canvey dead. What was it that brought all those Roman artefacts to Canvey, or all that pottery from mediaeval times? Some think there was a harbour on Canvey once, people certainly lived here for all that time. And they lived well, curing fish and making salt? What was it that brought large Roman amphora to Canvey, where excellent Italian wines would be appreciated all those years ago? With the rise in sea levels, it is estimated that in Roman times Canvey may not have been an island, with the land some 15 feet above sea level. Two thousand years are a lot of generations. With the present dredging of the Thames on behalf of the Super Port being created upriver, more of that evidence is being uncovered, swirled around and eroded. To say there simply isn’t the money in today’s climate for even a cabinet to collect and preserve this heritage is nonsense. There is funding available for the most obscure of reasons. The most important action would be recognition and appreciation.

By Robert Hallmann
On 18/06/2013

If you're already a registered user of this site, please login using the form on the left-hand side of this page.